Zach Lemaster

EPISODES


Episode 20.

Zach Lemaster, Founder and CEO of Rent to Retirement

00:00:00 – 00:02:00

… pleasing to the ear as those I caught up with Zach lamaster, founder and CEO of a rent to retirement. We chatted about investing via selfdirected Iras and Solo for one case, the shift of a homeowner nation to a renter nation, rental income surges and predictions, and a fun dive into the southwestern Florida rental real estate market. Thanks for listening. You’re listening to the real estate of things podcast. Welcome to the real estate of things podcast. I’m your host, Dalton Elliott. I’m joined today by Zach Lem Master, is the founder and CEO of rent to retirement. Zach, thank you so much for joining daltoness pleasure to be here. I know we’re going to talk about a lot of exciting stuff as we’re moving into the new year and, yeah, excited to be here. Yeah, this is one of the first episodes of the year and good to sit down with you and talk to me about rent to retirement. I don’t think you could come up with a better name. How do you lock that name down and give me some of the backstory of what you all do at Ourtr yeah, absolutely, it’s a little bit of a tongue twister but very true to the name in terms of, you know, what we try to accomplish for both ourselves and our clients very much building a rental Portfoli Olio to provide some level of retirement for investors really, whatever position there and if they’re a newer investor, if they’re looking to scale and diversify, whatever the case is. Real estate has really been for US Alton a game changer with with our own life. I actually have a medical background, working as an optometrist, as does my wife. We met in school in Oregon many years ago. I went into the air force since I was on scholarship for seven years and spent seven years in the Air Force as no dy and then moved to Colorado after I exited the Air Force to work as…

00:02:00 – 00:04:00

…a full time optometrists here running private practices. During the entire time we invested in rental real estate, starting very slowly. In the First House we purchased was just a duplex. run it out, half lived in half. Ended up trading that up doing it, you know. Well, we didn’t have to do a one thousand and thirty one on that one, but it ended up just scaling up every single year. Every single year since that first duplex, we bought more and more real estate and then strategically started to invest in different areas where we can maximize our returns, not just being focused on our local market, wherever that was. And then we got to the point where we were able to replace our active income with real estate investing. That allowed us to, you know, retire essentially from the healthcare career fields and take on a full time investor kind of position. And so a lot of our friends and family were looking at that saying that looks very interesting. We want to participate in real estate. We love the benefits of real state ownership. We don’t know where to start. How do you invest out of state? And hence the you know, rent retirement was born. We’re assisting investors in building passive income portfolios in the markets that offer offer the best returns, where a turnkey company, meaning we essentially sell investment properties clients that are fully renovated or new construction, which we work a lot with Leama one on to, you know, set them set themselves up to being a Sudonnari to obtain some sort of financial independence retirement picture. So that’s kind of a quick backstory on myself. Yeah, I want to I want to unpack that last part a little bit. The space of real estate investing is incredibly crowded with educators right for all different types. You have, on one end of the spectrum, you could say masterminds, kind of the the quote unquote, more elite education groups, peer to peer type groups, and then you have on the other end, folks looking to get into it, get into real estate investing for the first time. You have kind of local meet UPS. Talk me through your competitive advantage a little bit, because rent retirement isn’t I don’t see it, and correct me if I’m wrong. I don’t see it as just as…

00:04:00 – 00:06:00

…an education piece. It really is kind of a full service game plan maker. How would you how would you describe it? Yeah, absolutely, and you we work in the turnkey space. Turnkey is a very broad term that people have many different definitions of, and so we always want to clearly define that and really are competitive advantage. Delton is not just we’re not just selling properties to to clients. We’re helping them build a comprehensive business plan, because that’s what you’re doing when you’re investing in real estate, you you are building a business and there’s an silliary things that come along with that. To ensure that you’re going to be successful over time, you got to make sure you have the best financing options in place and sure you have the right CPA and attorney to make sure of your legal structure set up, you’re doing taxes appropriately. In my opinion, the best benefit of investing in real estate in general is the tax benefits. It’s like the tax code is exclusively written for real estate investors. So I mean our approach to assisting investors is to build a comprehensive business model and assist them in accomplishing their goals over time and stay engaged with those clients. Everyone is in a different position with where they’re at and they’re investing career. Some people are just getting started, some people have a large portfolio and they’re looking to diversify, exchange up, whatever the case is. We have built an entire network just from being successful investors ourselves to open that up to our clients. So yes, we’re selling turnkey investments to people that want to be, you know, a passive investor or diversify into the different markets that offer the best returns. But there’s a lot that goes into that. From a coaching and mentorship standpoint, we, as you mentioned, we see a lot of people in the education and these gudus out there that are offering seminars and charging people exorbitant amounts to do that. Well, in my personal opinion, is true. Education comes from hand on experience and actually investing. You can research and read all day long, but you know actually having that core group, that network of people, in surrounding yourself with people that are already successful with where you want to be, is the best place, in my opinion, to accomplish the success. You don’t need to spend…

00:06:00 – 00:08:01

…high dollar amounts of money on education when you know you could easily work with with a mentor team that assists you in actually building your own portfolio and simply learn over time. So I think that’s our competitive advantage, at least in the the turnkey space. Is a simple fact that you know. We obviously have our strategy to identify the markets that offer the best cash flow, equity and appreciation, but also coupling that with building an individual investment plan for the client, for our investor to help them be successful over time. Yeah, yeah, I think that’s a big differentiator and you hit the nail on the head, and my call it personal opinion, that you know the the hands on learning piece right for this. You you you could sit in a classroom for hours and hours and days and weeks and months and years working on the spreadsheets and talking to folks in the space, but to actually learn this space, you have to tell you have to do deals, you have to acquire real estate to be a real estate investor and everything outside of that is is just pre real estate investor. So that’s that’s a big differentiator on the turnkey space. And I want to talk about rental income for a man it right. So so HPA, home price appreciation, that has been up in to the right for the last eighteen, twenty four, thirty six, for really the last few years, the last year and a half it’s been astronomical. But one thing I think folks often forget. I think the the home price appreciation piece buys the headline space a lot of the time, but rents have surged to a greater degree in a lot of cases. And do you see any issues with the pace at which rents have throttled up over the last eighteen months. I think it’s hard to make a general assumption across the country because there’s that we really would need to look on a microeconomic scale and evaluate each market individually. Absolutely, there’s an affordability standpoint in some parts of the country…

00:08:01 – 00:10:01

…where rents are getting out of hand and you’ve actually seen the government come in and initiate rent control, which is very challenging thing from a from an investor perspective, where you’re capped on what you can charge and, you know, having the additional regulation that is imposed on the the property owner. A lot of the parts of the country that we focus on are your middle class rents. This is usually your eightos twelve hundred rent range. This is kind of your bread butter investment housing. That is always going to have demand. You’re always going to have affordability in those those price points as well. That gives us a lot of you know, we’re not doing these high end luxury houses where I do think to your point, there absolutely will be, you know, an affordability standpoint. Same thing with appreciation. We’ve been right in this train for a long time and people have been talking about a potential correction or, you know, whatever the case is, and I think that will happen at some point probably. I mean everyone wants to compare to two thousand and eight. In no way, shape or form or we in any sort of similar sort of setting, but I think it’s going to be very much market by market. In certain parts of the country you may see some areas where appreciation and rental increases or either capped or we start to see a slow down at some point in time. There is that we focus on all cash flow and that’s really the the core message. I mean we want to be an areas that have things like landlord friendly legislation, low taxes, population and economic growth, but fundamentally speaking, our main core criteria is ensuring the properties cash flow, because that way you have I mean, if you have a tenant in your property paying rent, it’s a sustainable property. The market can really do whatever it wants in terms of values and you know, we know that all real estate goes up over time. But I think that’s how you create a sustainable business model and focusing in different sectors of these these markets where you do see consistent affordability for rents. Yeah, it is so what markets have you excited right now? There’s I mean there’s a lot of different markets for…

00:10:01 – 00:12:01

…different reasons. Kind of the markets that we fil cocus on or a lot of the the Midwest and southeast. These would be the markets that fit our criteria we talked about previously from attacks and legislation standpoint, also where we see high rent to price ratios to be able to actually have a positive cash flow. There’s a lot of areas that you can’t, you simply can’t cash flow, east and west coast being up being a lot of those. So we invest heavily in Ohio, Missouri, Indiana. We do a lot of new construction and areas that still have affordability but are growing dramatically in terms of price points. This would be more of the southeast, Florida being one of the big states. I mean, if you just look at population trends over this past couple of years, everyone’s move into Texas and Florida, Texas being the the front runner. However, property taxes are going up dramatically year after year in Texas, which makes it a challenge to actually cash flow. So we want to be in the path of progress and be in those areas Florida as an area where you have a thousand people today moving the all the builders combined cannot keep up at the housing demand we right now or seeing the the houses that are on market for both rental and resale or on the we have the shortest amount of inventory that we’ve ever seen in history, as well as the shortest amount of time on market for rentals and Resales, and that’s just simply a supply and demand there’s so many people moving there and there’s a handful of different reasons for that. I mean you have the sunshine and the good weather, you know, and coastal access. You have general affordability, at least for right now. At this point in time, there’s no state income tax, land and friendly legislation. So a lot of what we do is new construction in Florida, but in general we’re always looking for the markets that meet our standard criteria we talked about. Yeah, is picking on Florida a little bit. What markets in Florida? I look Florida like California, like taxes. You have so many markets within that state. Are there any that are kind of on the opposite end of the trend that you’re shying away from?…

00:12:01 – 00:14:03

Or is it kind of the whole state in mass is just on fire? I think would be quite honest, you could throw a doll at the map of Florida and probably be okay if you’re investing. However, we do see certain areas, like Orlando, for instance, that the prices are starting to get rather rather aggressive and kind of hard to cash flow. But floridas, the big state. There’s a lot of a lot of land and and real estate that you know, you can participate in to be successful. Specifically with us, we’re focusing on southwest Florida. I mean a lot of the new construction stuff that you guys are actually funding for us to build. You know, just to run through actual numbers, were building these properties below three hundred thous the running out between twenty three to twenty four hundred dollars a month. I mean that’s going to be a double digit cash f return if you have long term debt with you know those kind of numbers. But the big key is those properties are praising usually between sixty to a hundred twentyzero more than we’re we’re building them for. So I mean there’s there’s just so much growth and I think that if you’re if you’re looking at all those metrics, being in areas that you’re still building below the median house price point, rents are still in the range that are going to allow you to cash flow and you still have that kind of demand and appreciation to give you mediate equity. That creates a win win scenario all around. Yeah, pulling back a little bit and just talking about kind of the US as moving more and more towards kind of that renter nation concept, you know, the the traditional American dream. I think is own the definition of the traditional American dream right. That SFAR home white pick at fence story that everybody knows by heart. A little shaky footing not not necessarily a good thing or a bad thing, but I think you look at other countries, like you look at England, like the UK, that has relatively higher rental rate then the US and other developed countries, and what do you think about the direction that the country’s heading from a rent or…

00:14:03 – 00:16:00

…standpoint? Do you think that you know what what? What pros and cons do you see, assuming that kind of the rental growth continues and build to rent as another you know thing that you touched on that in the last few years in our space on the private landing side of the business. Just money has been pouring into you from the capital market side of the fence and, by default, from the landing side of the fence. You have built to rent communities popping up all over the place. Whereas somebody would just build a house to rent out, you have entire communities, hundreds of sfar is that are our purpose built for this. So, you know, very long winded question there, but to circle back to it, does everything seem good and fine with that direction, or do we think there’s because some some downsides to that home ownership rate potentially decreasing over the next five, hundred and ten, twenty fifty years? Well, from an investor perspective it’s a good thing right when you when you have an increase in renter demographics. And it’s interesting because right now, Daldon rectors seeing it on both sides of the age different. So we’re seeing your younger generations that are it’s less of a priority for them to own a house. They don’t want to be locked down in a certain location. We’re seeing more people working from home, moving, you know, to higher rate and not transitioning to different, different markets and with, you know, to fast rate, versus I’m going to, you know, buy house and this is where I’m going to live for twenty plus years. That’s kind of an old mindset. People want to have access to amenities. The younger generations want to have access to certain things within the city that attract to them and because of that, you know, they just don’t have the same goals that we did. Is really as a country. But, you know, buying the single family house with with the white pick offense. You know, I think that isn’t an outdated thing. So we see rental increases increasing as causing higher rental demand. People are doing investors or conscious of this and…

00:16:00 – 00:18:00

…doing more building the actual communities, building the the rental properties that were participating. In addition to that, we’re seeing millennials and younger generations actually investing an investment property before they own own their own property, and so that’s a good thing to see. The same thing with baby boomers. We’re seeing a lot of the older generations that they have owned a house before and in their their point in their life, they don’t want to anymore. They want to have the convenience and accessibility of having a rental property or potentially even a couple a couple rentals or options to migrate around the country. So I mean this is something that we’re definitely seeing and it’s happening now. From from an investors perspective, this is something to be conscious of of. What sort of thing do you need in your rental property? What sort of amenities and areas or people migrating to and looking to, especially as they’re working more remotely? We’ve seen a lot of this is in causing increased rental demand and really all locations. Yeah, and you touched on supply demand earlier and that that’s not something from a home buyer perspective. That supply piece is not going to be quote unquote, fixed overnight or over the next twelve months orb probably even twenty four months. All right, and especially you look at I think even the most optimistic estimate that hits is in the three plus year mark, right. I mean you look at even supply chain issues that were still having today, that for the foreseeable future. I mentioned this very, very early on the PODCAST, but I was out at a conference in Vegas talking with a pretty big vendor for home builders and they said they are projections for materials were down thirty percent this year and they were marking it for the same projection for two thousand and twenty two, just not expecting things to get better in you know, what is now this year, two thousand and twenty two. So you know that. You know, assuming that that’s spot on, you’re not going to have…

00:18:00 – 00:20:02

…a normalized supply chain until at the earliest the tail end of two thousand and twenty two, which just means that the supply demand and balance and then you have the sheer number right anywhere from you know, I’ve seen as a low as one point five, one point eight million, up to many millions of homes of a deficit that we have to it seems like there’s the rental piece, is about is as true of a market fluctuation as there is. It’s pretty simple on its head, it seems. No there. I mean that’s kind of a load of question. There’s are, you know, kind of portion to talk about, but there’s just there’s so, so much that’s dynamic right now. These past few years, talking about covid and, you know, supply chain issues. There’s a lot that is that is concerning. But no doubt about it, we have in most markets, in the markets that we focus on, way more for housing demand than than we can supply, than all the builders and people doing, you know, rental properties can supply collectively. Again, that’s a good thing from an investor perspective because that means you’re going to going to have low vacancies, you’re going to see increasing rend amounts over time and those are the areas that you want to be investing in in the path of progress. But it’s not getting any better, you know, we’ve seen over this past year’s you need to be, I guess, agile and be able to strategically plan for how you’re going to adapt to the changing and always changing circumstances. We’ve seen some of our builder colleagues and competitors just stop building until there was there, you know, some some normalization and some of the materials. One thing that we did is actually pre order a lot of stuff and have involvement in concrete companies and lumber companies. We have some lots we purchase that are just basically fill fill yards for certain materials, and so there’s certain things you can do to make sure that you’re staying up to speed with with what that demand is. Is it more market driven or is it more purely product driven? In terms of the supplies? I would…

00:20:02 – 00:21:59

…say both. I mean, obviously there’s the inherent simple fact that people need a place to live, whether they’re buying or renting, and there’s just not that many options. For instance, that we focus on southwest Florida, what we’re seeing is a lot of people are actually going under contract to purchase these if if we’re building house for retail sale, once the slab is bored and you have multiple competitive cash offers for those purchases, because usually these are people that are leaving one of these really expensive coastal markets and they just sold their three ton s house for one point four million. You know they can come and buy a much larger house in Florida for a fraction of that cost. So there’s that aspect of it. And then you couple that with the the supply chain issues and what we’ve seen, especially with lumber and certain things over this past year. It’s been a challenge and it’s continuing, but you just again you have to adapt and have a plan for it and I think if you’re able to figure it out, this is a very attractive time to be in the rental space to be in the building space, especially. Yeah, the that migration from high costs of living to medium costs of living. That’s big. We’re, as I said, I’m two and a half hours away from Atlanta, which is where my day job Le More in capital where our company was founded and we still have a really good presence and monthly and annual loan production. They’re really strong foothold and talking with folks there they say that is a big driver of home prices. Not only do you have the supply issue, which is most everywhere in the country, but you have a large number of people leaving these high cost of living markets moving into you talked about the southeast, more more affordable regions, but relatively relatively speaking, medium cost of living compared to a Manhattan or San Francisco or Austin taxes somewhere like that. And then you look at the moves from northeast of Florida. That’s been…

00:22:00 – 00:24:00

…another big one. So I think those are going to that that migration is going to keep happening, especially with the fact that work from home is here to stay to a much bigger degree than it was pre pandemic. If there’s anything that I mean big, big kind of shift in the workplace market that we’ve seen with covid it’s exactly that point, Dalton, is the simple fact that businesses are finding out that people can actually be more efficient and they can cut a lot of overhead by having people were at home, you know, and really adapting to it. How are you going to do that? Even just zoom meetings are so much more prevalent right now. We should have invested in zoomstock or something back in the day. But you know that. So that that’s a big piece of it. And also, I think, taxes or another driving factor. You have some of these areas where the state income tax is just climbing, climbing, and you coupled that with the taxes on all consumer goods in that area, as well as the national attacks, which taxes aren’t going down. You know, it’s just a simple fact of life. And so you can move to a state that has zero and come tax and also has more affordability for cost of living while having her high paying job in a different part of the country. It just makes sense. Yeah, I want to, I want to switch gears. With the little bit of time we have left, can I pick your brain about selfdirected Iras for a minute. Yeah, absolutely. We have a lot of people that invest in real estate through selfdirecting the retirement or doing a solar for one K and I think it’s an exceptional way to add a little bit of diversity and participate in real estate through retirement vehicle. Yeah, I first learned about this I started at leam one capital six weeks after graduating college as an underwriter in the long term finance department. So was underwriting people in property or businesses and property for thirty year rental debt and closed our first I underwrote and closed our first loan. That went to an Stira, and want to hear from you a little…

00:24:00 – 00:26:02

…bit. I know there’s some some looming potential regulation changes, but first just what’s the explain it to me. Like I’m five, difference of using an Stira versus a solo for K or one K compared to just an off the shelf entity and LLC or something that’s usually the the normal emo for a real estate investor. Absolutely, so the big benefit just to kind of build this from the ground up. The big benefit of using a retirement vehicle or establishing one of these, taking an IRA or your traditional one K and moving it into just reclassifying it. Really is what it is, moving it into a selfdirected account or a solo for one K account. You work with a custodian to assist you with doing this, and so there’s professionals that will evaluate your situation and tell you the necessary paperwork and steps you have to do to basically transition the account, and all that does is allow you to invest in other other asset classes. selfdirected is a perfect name for the classification because it’s giving you control. That’s really what it’s about, is control of those retirement vehicles, instead of just being isolated to investing in stocks, mutual funds, bonds, what have you, to invest in other asset classes like real estate. Anyone that’s investing in real estate should know that there’s many different advantages to real estate and using leverage over time. I mean when we talk about rental real estate, yes, we know houses are appreciating, but there’s so many other benefits. I mean we obviously have passive income through cash flow. You also have the tenant paying your loan down for you, essentially your building equity. Over time. You’re using leverage to stretch your capital further and then you come with all these additional tax benefits. There’s nothing else out there that compares to real estate. But going back to the retirement vehicle aspect of things, once you change the classification of your retime and vehicle to say a selfdirected IRA, this allows you to invest in real estate and other assets and have some control.

00:26:02 – 00:28:02

You still have that tax benefit under that classification, but there’s certain things you need to be aware of. In certain regulations you need to use nonrecourse lending, which means you’re not personally liable. So it’s actually a safer loan because it’s just isolated to that particular property. But with that there’s different loan parameters. You know, you potentially might need a little bit more money down with nonrecourse lending, different varying interest rates, and that’s why it’s important to really work with professionals to see what all your options are. But allows you to scale up using another really in my opinion, of retirement account is just another resource for you to scale up your portfolio, and this is something just like equity in a house. If someone wants to pull out a heelock or use equity in their house to then reinvest in other properties, which many people have a lot of equity that’s just stagnant sitting in their property right now. Not because there are such a thing as return on equity and if your equity is just being sitting there not earning you a return, then your your return on equity would be zero. But with a selfdirected IRA, you can take your retirement vehicle, be proactive and invest in real estate all the income. I mean there’s certain things to be aware of that we would walk you through, or any professional in the space to show you that your income needs to go back into the account, you know, in certain things like that, but it’s an exceptional opportunity, still applying the same tax benefits, to invest in real estate and grow your portfolio will be on what you would be able to otherwise. Yeah, you at the beginning of this conversation you mentioned, you know, real estate and tax advantages being just beautifully linked together, and this is good way to come full circle on it, and that it’s tough to find. You have. You have the SDIRA, you have the Solo for one K, you have opportunity zones, you have a handful of items, vehicles, opportunities in the real estate world that just take that tax advantage to a completely higher degree. But to your point, knowing whenever we on the kind of Leano on capital ending side of the fence, when we first…

00:28:02 – 00:30:03

…created a product for this. This has been twenty fifteen, there are a lot of nuances that come with lending to kind of tax advantage account versus just a business entity, that this is absolutely not something you should go it alone or try to figure it out on your own, because literally you have to follow the letter of the law. You talked about proceeds. How those get used has to be a true non recourse, not a limited recourse. Like there are a lot of eyes that have to be dott in, teas that have to be crossed, but I’m a big believer in utilizing the tax code to its fullest potential, and that’s that’s so true, don’t I mean if we look at Congress right that you mentioned the plane about out impending changes potentially, and I mean yes, that the the tax code and really legislation will change over time. It’s always a dynamic space. However, if we just look at where we’ve been as a country, most I mean real estate has always been a protected place because the congress and there’s a reason why. A Hundred Percent Congress owns investment real estate, right, and that will come. That will continue to be the case. But the government imply certain tax codes to stimulate the economy they want. That’s how they influence the economies is through adjusting different tax codes, so by making it an advantage for real estate investors to participate in real estate and go out and borrow money and do things like this. I mean, that’s that’s why the the tax code is written the way it is, and you’re absolutely correct. You need to have a professional walk you through exactly what all the options and regulations are so you fully understand what the best option is for you. That my two favorite things in real estate tax concerning why is is the is doing a one thousand thirty one exchange, and also cost segregation studies. I mean, there is it’s a very real possibility that you can continue to trade up and buy more real estate without Av ever having to pay capital gains and you can pass that on in many cases to your future generations to build generational wealth with. In those taxes are…

00:30:03 – 00:32:02

…forgiven cost segregation studies, which is essentially accelerated depreciation. You can, if you’re an active investor and qualifies a real estate professional, you can very much wipe out your entire tax burden if you buy enough real estate every single year by taking accelerated depreciation. That’s exactly what we do every single year. But you got to be aware of these things and be working with the right people to help you map out that plan. I love it. I love it, and no better person to talk to you about that than you and no better group than rent to retirement. So tell the fine listeners of real estate of things how they can get in touch with you. Yeah, absolutely. You know, if someone is interested to learn more about working with us to purchase turnkey properties or just wants to have an initial consultation to find out a little bit more about investing in different markets and how we work with each client to help them build their plan, they can simply go to our website. It’s rent to retirementcom. That’s rent tio retirementcom. They can call our one eight hundred number one, eight hundred, three and six, seven eight one and reach out. The first thing we want to do with every single person is have a thirty minute consultation go over your investment goals, criteria, your timeline talk about the different opportunities available to you. We don’t charge clients for anything, by the way. We don’t charge people for consultations or any sort of mentorship. We sell properties, we build and renovate turn key properties, and so our income comes through the sale of those properties. All the advice and education and mentorship is absolutely free. We don’t charge that for for that at all. So we welcome anyone to reach out to us that would like to learn more. You do business the honest way. How beautiful and refreshing. I love it. I love it exact. Thank you so much for sitting down with me. I really appreciate it. Thank you so much to old it’s been a pleasure. Hey, thanks to everybody for listening. Talk soon. Take care. Are you a real estate investor looking for the right…

00:32:04 – 00:33:04

…lender that can finance all your deals and help you scale Lima one capital has the best suite of loan products in the industry, Barnet, whether that’s fix and flips, fix and holds, building new construction or buying rental properties. They have incredible finance and solutions for it all. A reliable common since Linder is one of the most important parts of your investment team, and that’s exactly what you get with Lima one. Let Lima one capital show you how they’ve helped thousands of real estate investor scale and increase their wealth. Check out Lima onecom or call eight hundred two five nine zero five ninety five to speak with the consultant and preparation for your next project. Thank you for joining us today on the real estate of things podcast. Subscribe and tune in weekly for new content from the industry’s best while we continue to unpack the nuances of this dynamic market. Follow US across social media for additional insights and analysis on the topics covered in each episode, and remember to rate, review and share the show.

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